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Thursday, 7 May 2020

Superbloom is out of this world! NASA satellite images show a sea of orange poppies in southern California despite fears historic droughts would stop flowers sprouting

California’s superbloom was expected to ‘be bust’ due to a historical drought that plagued the state earlier this year.
However, a ‘March Miracle’ brought significant rainfall that birthed fields of fiery orange poppies across the Antelope Valley Poppy Reserve landscape.
NASA has now shared a stunning image of the wildflowers as seen from space, which shows patches throughout the valley.
Park officials called this bloom an ‘unexpected’ surprise due to the late season rains, but suggest the wildflowers may stick around longer than usual.
NASA has now shared a stunning image of the wildflowers as seen from space, which shows patches of blooms throughout the valley
NASA has now shared a stunning image of the wildflowers as seen from space, which shows patches of blooms throughout the valley
The US Drought Monitor showed 60 percent of California was either ‘abnormally dry’ or in a ‘moderate drought’ in January and February of this year, when rainfall is necessary for the state's superbloom.
Richard Minnich, a professor of geography in the Earth Sciences Department at the University of California, Riverside, told SFGate in February: ‘The rains have shut off since Christmas.’

‘It also has been a cold winter and that suppressed the growth of everything. I’ve seen years where we have the March Miracle.’
‘We’ve had a year where it’s terrible all winter and then we have a gush of rain in March.
California’s superbloom was expected to ‘be bust’ due to a historical drought that plagued the state earlier this year. However, a ‘March Miracle’ brought significant rainfall that birthed fields of fiery orange poppies across the Antelope Valley Poppy Reserve landscape
California’s superbloom was expected to ‘be bust’ due to a historical drought that plagued the state earlier this year. However, a ‘March Miracle’ brought significant rainfall that birthed fields of fiery orange poppies across the Antelope Valley Poppy Reserve landscape
Park officials called this bloom is an ‘unexpected’ surprise due to the late season rains, but suggest the wildflowers may stick around longer than usual
Park officials called this bloom is an ‘unexpected’ surprise due to the late season rains, but suggest the wildflowers may stick around longer than usual
'If we don’t get any late rains, it will be a bust this year, and the late rains might be too late anyway. We’re being hurt by the January-February drought this year.’
California received its ‘Miracle March’ with enough rainfall for its majestic superbloom.
Lancaster, where the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve is located, received around 10.5 inches of rain in March and April, which is nearly four inches above the average.
A sea of orange poppies fill the valley, so much that NASA's Operation Land Image (OLI) satellite was able to capture an image of the stunning bloom while orbiting in space.  
For years, crowds have flocked to the park to catch a glimpse of the stunning bloom, but due to the coronavirus pandemic it has been shutdown to visitors. However, the outbreak is not stopping people from enjoying the views – many have disregarded officials to run, dance and pose for photos in fields. Pictured is a face mask among the flowers
For years, crowds have flocked to the park to catch a glimpse of the stunning bloom, but due to the coronavirus pandemic it has been shutdown to visitors. However, the outbreak is not stopping people from enjoying the views – many have disregarded officials to run, dance and pose for photos in fields. Pictured is a face mask among the flowers
Lancaster, where the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve is located, received around 10.5 inches of rain in March and April, which is nearly four inches above the average. The heavy rainfall was just enough to sprout flowers across the valley
Lancaster, where the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve is located, received around 10.5 inches of rain in March and April, which is nearly four inches above the average. The heavy rainfall was just enough to sprout flowers across the valley
Although California residents are under stay-at-home orders amid the coronavirus, some could not miss the chance for a photo in the fields of poppies
Although California residents are under stay-at-home orders amid the coronavirus, some could not miss the chance for a photo in the fields of poppies
California is known for its stunning blooms that usually occur in the spring months. Poppies grow wild across the landscape and is destination for thousands of people
California is known for its stunning blooms that usually occur in the spring months. Poppies grow wild across the landscape and is destination for thousands of people
For years, crowds have flocked to the park to catch a glimpse of the stunning bloom, but due to the coronavirus pandemic it has been shutdown to visitors.
However, the outbreak is not stopping people from enjoying the views – many have disregarded officials to run, dance and pose for photos in fields.
California State Parks Interpreter Jean Rhyne told SFGate: ‘There are a lot of people not obeying the stay-at-home order, but visitation to the valley is only a fraction of what it would normally be at this time.’
People from all over take the trip to southern California to visit the Antelope Valley Poppy Reserve near Lancaster
People from all over take the trip to southern California to visit the Antelope Valley Poppy Reserve near Lancaster
The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve State Natural Reserve has been closed to the public temporarily to avoid large gathering, but some could not resist visiting the stunning bloom
The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve State Natural Reserve has been closed to the public temporarily to avoid large gathering, but some could not resist visiting the stunning bloom
California has been under stay-at-home orders for more than a month due to the coronavirus - the Golden State has more than 56,000 cases and over 2,000 reported deaths. 
Although the coronavirus has infected nearly every country around the world, the US has been hit the hardest.
As of Wednesday there are over 1.2 million cases and more than 72,000 deaths across the nation.

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