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Tuesday, 9 June 2020

WATCH: White Cops, Civilians Wash Feet Of Black Organizers, Ask For Forgiveness

Over the weekend, white police officers and civilians in Cary, North Carolina, washed the feet of black community leaders, who organized the protest concerning the death of George Floyd, as they asked for forgiveness for their white ancestors’ sins.
TMZ reported that the “moving scene” from Saturday captured “a handful of white folks (who) came together to clean the feet of black religious leaders, while offering a prayer repenting for the sins inflicted on black people at large.”
Cary Town Council Mayor Lori Bush posted photos of the display to Twitter on Sunday.
“Honored to join the many at the Unity Prayer Walk in [Cary, NC],” Bush said. “Several stops to pray.”
“Poignant moment when [Morrisville, NC] Chief Andrews shares her family story [and] pastors and police stop to wash the feet of black community leaders,” she added, ending with the hashtag “#BlackLivesMattter.”
Honored to join the many at the Unity Prayer Walk in . Several stops to pray. Poignant moment when @Morrisville_NC Chief Andrews shares her family story & pastors and police stop to wash the feet of black community leaders.
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According to Yahoo News, during the walk, event hosts Faith and Soboma Wokoma, “sat down on a park bench and members of the community surrounded them, washing their feet while asking for forgiveness.”
“As we look through civil rights history, the church was always such a big part of change. And we don’t want it to just be the black church or white church, or Asian church,” Faith Wokoma told ABC 11, Yahoo reported, adding, “We want the body of Christ to come together, collectively.”
Photo and video below:
White protesters wash the feet of black protest organizers and beg for forgiveness in Cary, North Carolina.
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Police Officers wash the feet of Black faith leaders and beg for forgiveness in Cary, NC 🀦🏽‍♂️
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Not everyone was on board with the symbolic moment.
“I don’t even have the vocabulary to describe these types of ridiculous performances by white People lol,” mocked The Washington Post’s Karen Attiah.
“And I grew up as an evangelical Christian,” she added, “so I know how significant feet-washing is as a symbol of humility. But. Still. I…..oof.”
And I grew up as an evangelical Christian, so I know how significant feet-washing is as a symbol of humility.

But. Still. I.....oof.
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Angela Stanton King added, “Dear white people, I’m a black woman that supports the fight against injustice and I’m not kneeling. In fact, I refuse to bow for any man except God. I want you to STAND with us, not kneel in submission.”
Dear white people,

I’m a black woman that supports the fight against injustice and I’m not kneeling. In fact, I refuse to bow for any man except God.

I want you to STAND with us, not kneel in submission.
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The theme of white people kneeling and asking for forgiveness of their ancestors’ sins and for their alleged “white privilege” took hold last week.
“During a protest over the death of George Floyd, dozens of white protesters knelt before a group of African American protesters and asked for forgiveness from past sins of white people, which the leader described as ‘years and years of racism, of systematic racism,'” The Daily Wire reported.
In response, the black protesters knelt with their white counterparts and joined them in prayer.
“We’re not shaming anybody, we’re just humbling ourselves before You,” the man said. “You brought the thunder and rain today, God, because Satan takes the ‘L’ today. Father, in Jesus’ name you get the victory.”
“Father, we ask for forgiveness from our black brothers and sisters for years and years of racism, of systematic racism,” he added.
“You are the God of reconciliation,” one black male at the front of the group said. “Not only do we receive their repentance, but, God, we repent as the black community, for holding unforgiveness, for acting out of anger, for, Father God, failing our own community, at times.”
Protests over Floyd’s death quickly turned violent last week, including arson, looting, and violence in places like Minneapolis, Los Angeles, Atlanta, New York City, Rochester, Richmond, and other cities.

Since the death of Floyd, all four officers involved in the arrest have been fired, investigations from the FBI and state law enforcement have been opened, and Derek Chauvin, the officer at the center of the incident, was taken into custody and charged with second-degree murder.

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