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Wednesday, 22 July 2020

Alien abduction?! Mysterious giant hangar spotted at Area 51 three months ago has DISAPPEARED, new aerial pictures reveal

A pilot has again shared photos of Area 51 and other top secret installations on the Nevada Test and Training Range after receiving permission to fly through highly restricted airspace -- and a large new hangar spotted during his April flyby now appears to be gone.
Gabriel Zeifman took the images earlier this month while flying in his Cessna 150 right along the border of 'The Box', a term for the no-go zone surrounding Area 51 within the larger restricted airspace of Nellis Air Force Range in Nevada. 
Zeifman received permission from air traffic controllers to pass through Nellis Range airspace because it was 'cold', meaning no military flights were taking place. 
This is the third time since April that Zeifman, a trained air traffic controller, has released images of Groom Lake, the highly classified Air Force facility more commonly known as Area 51. 

In this picture from April, a large new hangar appeared to be under construction, with tarps or canvas covering part of the roof. Many speculated about its intended purpose, but the structure was gone by early July
In this picture from April, a large new hangar appeared to be under construction, with tarps or canvas covering part of the roof. Many speculated about its intended purpose, but the structure was gone by early July
Area 51 is seen from the north in new photos of the facility taken by pilot Gabriel Zeifman in late May
Area 51 is seen from the north in new photos of the facility taken by pilot Gabriel Zeifman in late May
Few outsiders have ever gotten a glimpse of Area 51 with their own eyes, but Zeifman is the rare exception
Few outsiders have ever gotten a glimpse of Area 51 with their own eyes, but Zeifman is the rare exception 
Another view of Area 51 from the east is seen from Zeifman's flyby past the facility in early July
Another view of Area 51 from the east is seen from Zeifman's flyby past the facility in early July
Private pilot warned to avoid Area 51 airspace during Nevada landing
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Video released by Zeifman shows Nellis ATC warning him not to enter The Box but allowing him to fly directly alongside the truly restricted border. 
Even from outside of Area 51 airspace, Zeifman was able to catch a glimpse of the secretive Air Force facility, which has long been the focus of unconfirmed rumors about testing on extraterrestrial technology.
Zeifman's new images, shot in late May and early July, show that a massive new hangar that was under construction in April now appears to have been taken down.
It's possible that the structure was only a temporary frame covered with canvas, intended for short-term use.
The new photos also show what appears to be ongoing construction work moving earth at the southwest corner of the facility.
The new photos also show what appears to be ongoing construction work (far left) moving earth at the southwest corner of the facility
The new photos also show what appears to be ongoing construction work (far left) moving earth at the southwest corner of the facility
Zeifman received permission from air traffic controllers to pass through Nellis Range airspace because it was 'cold', meaning no military flights were taking place. Pictured: Area 51 is seen in early July
Zeifman received permission from air traffic controllers to pass through Nellis Range airspace because it was 'cold', meaning no military flights were taking place. Pictured: Area 51 is seen in early July
Even from outside of Area 51 airspace, Zeifman was able to catch a glimpse of the secretive Air Force facility
Even from outside of Area 51 airspace, Zeifman was able to catch a glimpse of the secretive Air Force facility
Another massive hangar sits isolated on the far southern edge of Area 51 in April. It has been there for several years
Another massive hangar sits isolated on the far southern edge of Area 51 in April. It has been there for several years

'Probably the most exciting part was the first time I saw Groom Lake, it's just such a rare place to see,' Zeifman told DailyMail.com in April. 'It's something everyone has heard of but few get to look at. So I'm glad to share a glimpse of it.' 
'It's definitely interesting flying in the area, all the history out there and the current activities that take place (testing, and exercises such at Red Flag with all the US military branches and NATO allies),' Zeifman said.
'So it's very neat to get permission to fly in there. That being said, you also gotta be on your top game when you're flying close to pieces of airspace you are not allowed to enter. You never want to stray into someplace you're not allowed, so it's definitely something to be very careful with when you're closely tracking a line,' he continued. 
Area 51 is just one of the sensitive military facilities located within the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), a vast military training area in Nevada's Mojave Desert.
Details of everything that takes place at Area 51 are classified as top secret, and the intense secrecy around the facility has led to widespread conspiracy theories that it is used to store captured or crashed UFOs. 
What is officially acknowledged is that Area 51 was founded by the CIA in 1955 as a testing facility for the secretive U-2 spy plane, and that it has likely been used ever since to test highly classified and experimental aircraft.
The locations of Area 51 as well as the Tonopah Test Range Airport are seen within the Nevada Test and Training Range
The locations of Area 51 as well as the Tonopah Test Range Airport are seen within the Nevada Test and Training Range
Area 51 is seen in the distance next to partially flooded Groom Lake in a view from Zeifman's Cessna 150 in April
Area 51 is seen in the distance next to partially flooded Groom Lake in a view from Zeifman's Cessna 150 in April
Details of everything that takes place at Area 51 (seen in April) are classified as top secret, and the intense secrecy around the facility has led to widespread conspiracy theories that it is used to store captured or crashed UFOs
Details of everything that takes place at Area 51 (seen in April) are classified as top secret, and the intense secrecy around the facility has led to widespread conspiracy theories that it is used to store captured or crashed UFOs 
Zeifman's photos show one huge hangar, built about five years ago according to The Drive, sitting alone on the south end of the facility. Its purpose has never been disclosed.
In April, Zeifman was also able to capture stunning images of the Tonopah Test Range Airport, a major military airfield within the NTTR.
Tonopah was most famously the test site used to evaluate the capabilities of secretly obtained Soviet MiG fighters during the Cold War.
At the height of the Cold War, a secret squadron of Air Force pilots even flew the Soviet fighter jets in mock dogfights against U.S. aircraft to train American airmen. That program was declassified in 2006.
Tonopah was also the main operating base for the Lockheed F-117A Nighthawk for many years, after tests on the stealth fighter were completed at Area 51. Today the surviving fleet of production F-117As remains stored at Tonopah.
Today, the 30th Reconnaissance Squadron flies RQ-170 Sentinel stealth drones out of the Tonopah.
Zeifman also captured images of the Tonopah Test Range Airport (above in April), a major military airfield within the NTTR
Zeifman also captured images of the Tonopah Test Range Airport (above in April), a major military airfield within the NTTR
To the left of the runways at Toponah sit hangars that have housed F-117A Nighthawks and stealth drones
To the left of the runways at Toponah sit hangars that have housed F-117A Nighthawks and stealth drones
Toponah (above) was also once the home of a classified squadron of test pilots who flew captured Soviet MiG fighters
Toponah (above) was also once the home of a classified squadron of test pilots who flew captured Soviet MiG fighters
Today, the 30th Reconnaissance Squadron flies RQ-170 Sentinel stealth drones out of the Tonopah (above)
Today, the 30th Reconnaissance Squadron flies RQ-170 Sentinel stealth drones out of the Tonopah (above)
Zeifman explained that he had been careful to receive permission for his flights through the highly restricted airspace. The consequences otherwise could have been disastrous.
'Most of the restricted airspace out there is designated continuously. So what that means is, as a pilot, you have to presume it's always restricted,' he told DailyMail.com. 
'In these blocks of airspace, you need to talk to Nellis Approach and be on radar service and get specific permission to enter. If you're flying a route that will go through and the airspace isn't actively being used by the military, it is possible to receive this permission for some of the blocks of airspace,' he explained.
'I found some times that I thought it may be clear and chose a destination that would take me through the airspace, and luckily a few of the times I was granted permission to transit the airspace,' he said. 
As for any national security implications of sharing the images, it is worth noting that Russia can and does fly directly over Area 51 with sophisticated reconnaissance planes under the Open Skies Treaty. 

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