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Sunday, 12 July 2020

Mystery of Dyatlov Pass is solved after 61 years: Russian prosecutors rule skiers found dead after stripping off clothes and fleeing through woods in terror were victims of hypothermia... and NOT aliens

The mystery of Dyatlov Pass has been solved after 61 years, as Russian prosecutors rule the skiers died of hypothermia after stripping off their clothes and fleeing in terror. 
Led by 23-year-old Ifor Dyatlov, the experienced skiers failed to finish their 220mile-ski trek, sparking a huge manhunt.
Investigators later discovered their frozen bodies - many with missing body parts, others naked, and some with inexplicable injuries. 
Decades-long rumours of natural disasters, yetis, and the supernatural have all been speculated as causing the deaths. 
But now a new probe by the Russian prosecutor-general's office has concluded the group was killed by hypothermia - and that they had 'no chance' of survival.   
A new probe by the Russian prosecutor-general's office has concluded the group was killed by hypothermia
A new probe by the Russian prosecutor-general's office has concluded the group was killed by hypothermia
Led by 23-year-old Ifor Dyatlov, the skiers failed to finish their mission, sparking a huge manhunt
Led by 23-year-old Ifor Dyatlov, the skiers failed to finish their mission, sparking a huge manhunt
What is known of that fateful night is that Ural Polytechnic students  - seven men and two women, had made camp for the night at the foot of Kholat Syakhl, the Dead Mountain.
Now investigators say the nine fled in terror - and ran through the snow a mile or so down the mountain - from their tents in the deep nighttime cold, not having time to dress. 
Their tent had been mysteriously slashed from the inside, their camp was deserted and they had left their clothes and belongings behind.
The empty tent baffled investigators, as it still contained items of clothing and pairs of shoes - implying that some of the students had ventured out into the wilderness barefoot and without coats. 
Days after investigators found the tent the first two bodies were discovered. 
Yuri Doroshenko and Yuri Krivonischenko were found lying in the snow on flat land near a river, a mile from the tent, next to the remains of a long burnt-out fire. 

Lyudmila Dubinina, 21, was also found without her eyes and mouth after the notorious Dyatlov Pass incident
Lyudmila Dubinina, 21, was also found without her eyes and mouth after the notorious Dyatlov Pass incident
Around 350 yards away lay the corpse of Dyatlov, the engineering student who had put the expedition together and was its leader. 
His name would later be given to the area where the tragedy took place, as well as the incident itself.
Nearby, a search dog sniffed out the remains of Zina Kolmogorova, 22, under four inches of snow, and then that of Rustem Slobodin.
The bodies were in a line 200 yards apart, as if they had been trying to crawl behind each other back up to the shelter of the tent, but never made it.  
The final bodies were not found until the snow melted two months later in a ravine, with fractured skulls and chest injuries. 
The tongue and eyes of Lyudmila Dubinina, 21, and Semen Zolotarev, 38, were missing.  
They were discovered under 15ft of snow in a den they had desperately hollowed out for themselves before succumbing to the cold. 
A leading Russian doctor claimed Semen's injuries were likely the result of a 'big creature'
A leading Russian doctor claimed Semen's injuries were likely the result of a 'big creature'
Striking camp: The skiers setting up camp on February 2, 1959 in a snap taken from a roll of film found by investigators, which is the last known photo of them alive
Striking camp: The skiers setting up camp on February 2, 1959 in a snap taken from a roll of film found by investigators, which is the last known photo of them alive
In 2019, Russian authorities made the surprise announcement that they planned to reopen the case in a bid to solve the case once and for all.  
Now senior state prosecutor Andrei Kuryakov has revealed the group's tent had been in danger from an avalanche and that the party rushed from their camp to shield behind a ridge. 
'This was a natural avalanche limiter. They did everything right' 
But he claimed that when the group turned around, they had lost sight of their tent. 
'Visibility was 16 metres. They lit a fire and then searched for their tent - but it had vanished in the whiteout after the avalanche.
The tongue and eyes of Semen Zolotarev, 38, were missing, when investigators discovered his body
The tongue and eyes of Semen Zolotarev, 38, were missing, when investigators discovered his body

He revealed the group 'froze to death in temperatures of between minus 40C and minus 45C'. 
'It was an heroic fight. There was no panic, but they had no chance in these circumstances.' 
An experiment was conducted in an attempt to recreate the circumstances faced by the Soviet skiers.
Part of the reason for  conspiracy theories over the incident was the fact that the Soviet authorities hushed up their deaths.
The mysterious case has been the subject of books, documentaries, movies, and computer games.
They were believed to have fled from an 'unknown compelling force', according to a Soviet investigation at the time.

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