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Monday, 16 November 2020

Bernie Sanders claims majority of Americans support a ‘far-left agenda’ that includes raising minimum wage to $15 as he says he’d accept a position in President-elect Joe Biden’s cabinet

 Sen. Bernie Sanders claimed that Americans widely embrace a 'far-left agenda,' noting support for increasing the minimum wage and expanded healthcare.

The Vermont lawmaker made the remarks to CNN's Jake Tapper on Sunday during an appearance on State of the Union, in which he also confessed that he'd be willing to join the Biden-Harris administration.

While speaking about implementing President-elect Joe Biden's progressive policies, Sanders recalled how their two teams met before the election to determine key issues.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders (right) told CNN's Jake Tapper (left) that raising the minimum wage and expanding healthcare are 'commonsense ideas' supported by most Americans

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders (right) told CNN's Jake Tapper (left) that raising the minimum wage and expanding healthcare are 'commonsense ideas' supported by most Americans 

'I sometimes find it amusing when our opponents talk about the far left agenda,' Sanders told CNN.


'The truth is that when you talk about raising the minimum wage to 15 bucks an hour, when you're talking about expanding health care to all people as a human right, when you talk about effectively taking on climate change, when you talk about making public colleges and universities tuition free, these are not far-left ideas.

'These are commonsense ideas that the majority of the American people support.'

Sanders added that 'we're going to fight to make sure that they are implemented.'

A September survey by Public Agenda, a nonpartisan research and public engagement organization, found that 72 per cent of surveyors supported raising the minimum wage.

Broken down, that translated to 62 per cent of Republicans, 69 per cent of Independents and 87 per cent of Democrats.

Residents in Florida wait to cast their ballots on Oct. 30. They voted to increase the minimum wage on election day to $15 an hour

Residents in Florida wait to cast their ballots on Oct. 30. They voted to increase the minimum wage on election day to $15 an hour

Biden tells supporters: 'If Florida goes blue, it's over!'
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An uptick in support appeared to coincide with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, which has thrown numerous industries into the fray and unemployment reached staggering levels.

A March survey, distributed before lockdown restrictions began, reported raising the minimum wage received 66 per cent support overall. Surveyed Republicans tallied in at 48 per cent, Independents at 54 per cent and Democrats at 80 per cent. 

A real life push for $15 minimum wage was seen in Florida, where residents voted to increase pay on Election Day.  

Regarding healthcare expansions, a September Pew Research Center survey found that a majority of Americans want a single government program - not a mix of private and public coverage as is offered now.    


Bernie Sanders (pictured): '

Bernie Sanders (pictured): '

 On State of the Union, Sanders said it the notion that such progressive policies were responsible for a number of 2020 election losses was 'dead wrong.' 

One reported point of contention was the divided support for defunnding the police among some progressive politicians, including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, but Sanders pushed back on its supposed popularity among colleagues.

'Nobody I know who's running for office talks about defunding the police,' he said on State of the Union.

'What we talk about is making police officers accountable, making sure that police departments do what they can do best, figuring out how you deal with mental illness, how you deal with homelessness, whether those are, in fact, police responsibilities, making sure the police officers are not killing innocent African-Americans. That is not defund the police.'

After admitting he would accept the Secretary of Labor position if offered by the Biden, Sanders reiterated his stance once again.

'I talked to the Biden administration,' Sanders said, confirming that he was in contact with the Biden transition team.

'I want to do my best in whatever capacity as a senator or in the administration to protect the working families of this country.' 

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