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Friday, 27 November 2020

Wall-to-wall booze! Couple discover 66 bottles of $1,000 Prohibition-era whiskey called 'Old Smuggler' hidden in walls and floorboards of their Upstate NY home that was once owned by a German baron bootlegger

 A couple has been left stunned after finding 66 bottles of Prohibition-era whiskey hidden in the walls and floorboards of their upstate New York home. 

Nick Drummond and Patrick Bakker purchased the property in the town of Ames late last year, and were told it once belonged to a 'childless German baron who turned to bootlegging in the 1920s'.  

The pair passed off the story as nothing more than folklore until they began renovating the 105-year-old residence last month, and discovered concealed liquor in the spaces between the walls and floors.   

Drummond told CNN that he was removing outside skirting from a mudroom when he found the bottles of whiskey wrapped up in brown paper.  

A New York couple has been left stunned after finding 66 bottles of Prohibition-era whiskey hidden in the walls and floorboards of their upstate home. All of the bottles are Old Smuggler Gaelic whiskey - a Scottish label which is still in production today

A New York couple has been left stunned after finding 66 bottles of Prohibition-era whiskey hidden in the walls and floorboards of their upstate home. All of the bottles are Old Smuggler Gaelic whiskey - a Scottish label which is still in production today

Drummond told CNN that he was removing outside skirting from a mudroom when he found the bottles of whiskey wrapped up in brown paper

Drummond told CNN that he was removing outside skirting from a mudroom when he found the bottles of whiskey wrapped up in brown paper

Nick Drummond and Patrick Bakker (pictured)  purchased the property in the town of Ames late last year, and were told it once belonged to a 'childless German baron who turned to bootlegging in the 1920s'

Nick Drummond and Patrick Bakker (pictured)  purchased the property in the town of Ames late last year, and were told it once belonged to a 'childless German baron who turned to bootlegging in the 1920s'

The three story home in Ames is pictured. Drummond and Bakker had no idea of the  property's incredible history when they made the purchase last year

The three story home in Ames is pictured. Drummond and Bakker had no idea of the  property's incredible history when they made the purchase last year 

Couple find prohibition era whiskey in the walls of their home
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'I'm like what is that? I'm was very confused... I'm like holy crap. This is like a whiskey stash. And this is like, all of a sudden, the whole story of the bootlegger [makes sense].'

Drummond shared video of the remarkable moment to his Instagram page - which has recently attracted thousands of new followers. 

 'OUR WALLS ARE BUILT OF BOOZE!' he wrote.


'I can't believe the rumors are true! He was actually a bootlegger! I mean I thought it was a cute story, but the builder of our house was ACTUALLY a bootlegger!'

The couple uncovered 42 bottles of whiskey in the wall space. All of the bottles are Old Smuggler Gaelic whiskey - a Scottish label which is still in production today. 

However, Drummond and Bakker went on to discover even more concealed booze beneath floorboards inside the mudroom. 

Drummond and Bakker went on to discover even more concealed booze beneath floorboards inside the mudroom

Drummond and Bakker went on to discover even more concealed booze beneath floorboards inside the mudroom

So far, the pair have found a total of 66 bottles, and say it's likely they'll come across others as they continue their renovations. 

The bottles are estimated to be worth around $1,000 a pop - but the couple did not reveal whether they had opened one to give the whiskey a try. 

Unlike wine, whiskey does not improve with age once it has been bottled. While it's unlikely to be harmful if the pair do decide to drink it, there's no guarantee that it'll taste any good.  

Bottles of the whiskey - dating back at least 90 years - were discovered wrapped in brown paper

Bottles of the whiskey - dating back at least 90 years - were discovered wrapped in brown paper 

After making the discovery, Drummond subsequently began researching the history of the home, and learned there was some truth to the rumors it was owned by a 'a 'childless German baron who turned to bootlegging'.

The original owner was a German man known as Count Adolph Humpfner - who died died mysteriously in 1932 and left behind a large fortune.   

'His estate was worth over $140,000 in 1932,' Drummond told his Instagram followers. 

'He had many aliases and was known as the mystery man of the Mohawk Valley, and 'the count'; although there was never proof of his royalty beyond his own claims.

'It was a mystery to locals at the time how he amassed his fortune. He owned a local bank, the school gymnasium, and 23 properties in NYC and NJ.'

Now, it seems apparent that he amassed his fortune through bootlegging during the Prohibition-era, which ran from 1920- 1933.  

Ames is located about halfway between New York City and the Canadian border, making it the perfect place for bootleggers who may have been bringing in illegal alcohol form the north.  

Drummond subsequently began researching the history of the home, and learned there was some truth to the rumors it was owned by a 'a 'childless German baron who turned to bootlegging'

Drummond subsequently began researching the history of the home, and learned there was some truth to the rumors it was owned by a 'a 'childless German baron who turned to bootlegging'

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