Pages

Monday, 31 August 2020

Wife of top US spy who shot himself dead claims he wanted to murder her and 'take her to the afterlife' before she fled the home where he kept a haul of bondage gear, guns and thousands of rounds of ammunition

The wife of a high-ranking CIA operative who shot and killed himself two weeks after their wedding has claimed that he was intending to murder her and 'take me to the afterlife'.
Sara Corcoran, 46, said that Anthony Ming Schinella, the most senior military affairs analyst in U.S. intelligence, was suffering from PTSD after being involved in four wars, and after almost 30 years in the CIA.  
Schinella, 52, died on June 14 in Arlington, Virginia, but his death had not been widely reported until this week, when The Intercept revealed a medical examiner’s report listed his cause of death as suicide from a gunshot wound to the head.
Schinella was just weeks away from retirement as National Intelligence Officer for Military Issues, and had married journalist Cocoran just weeks prior to his death.
Corcoran was in her car in the driveway of their home trying to get away from Schinella, when she witnessed his suicide.

Anthony Ming Schinella, 52, died on June 14 in Arlington, Virginia. A medical examiner's report revealed that the senior intelligence official died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head
Anthony Ming Schinella, 52, died on June 14 in Arlington, Virginia. A medical examiner's report revealed that the senior intelligence official died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head
Schinella's new wife Sara Cocoran
Corcoran and Schinella are seen at their wedding just weeks prior to his death
Schinella's new wife Sara Cocoran (left and with him, right) said that she was in her car in the driveway of their home, trying to get away from Schinella, when she witnessed his suicide
Schinella warns hostile countries are stealing US tech in 2018
Loaded: 0%
Progress: 0%
0:00
Previous
Play
Skip
Mute
Current Time0:00
/
Duration Time1:15
Fullscreen
Need Text

She said Schinella was fascinated by Egyptian concepts of the underworld.
'My husband was planning on murdering me. He had talked about taking me to the afterlife before,' she told The Sun. 
'We would often watch documentaries on Egypt, Valley of the Kings, pharaohs.'
She told The Sun that on the night of June 14 he drank a glass and a half of vodka, and collected a stash of personal items to keep by his bed - including cards from the Chinese Zodiac, handcuffs, and love letters Corcoran had written him.
'To have those three things together, you're only going to sit there and kind of go through all of the notes I've ever written to you if you're getting ready to leave this world,' she said. 
While Schinella continued drinking vodka, she begged him to 'go to sleep', telling him: 'You've got to stop'.
She said: 'He pulled out a Glock and threatened to kill himself for two hours. 
'I was trying to talk him out of it. It was a traumatic ordeal.
'I was only fearful he was going to kill me when he started asking me about my grandfather.
'I didn't call 911 at first because I was afraid he would shoot himself and me.'

Corcoran and Schinella married May 29, honeymooning at the Trump Hotel in Washington DC
Corcoran and Schinella married May 29, honeymooning at the Trump Hotel in Washington DC

Corcoran said that her new husband was suffering from PTSD following a lengthy CIA career
Corcoran said that her new husband was suffering from PTSD following a lengthy CIA career
Corcoran said she grew increasingly frightened when she found her husband fiddling with the gas stove - fearing that he intended to blow up the house. 
As she ran away, her husband followed her outside and as she jumped into his car, he shot himself in the head.
Corcoran said that after Schinella's death, she discovered a large collection of bondage and S&M gear that had been hidden in his house.
She also discovered 24 guns and thousands of rounds of ammunition. 
Corcoran said that the CIA has completed an investigation into Schinella’s death, but that the agency didn’t provide her with any details. 
Corcoran also told the paper that Schinella was obsessed with her grandfather, Thomas Gardiner Corcoran, a famed Washington lobbyist who served as an adviser to Franklin D. Roosevelt and worked on the New Deal.
Nicknamed 'Tommy the Cork', he died in 1981, and Schinella reportedly began asking who she loved more, and who was a better man.
Schinella was the highest-ranking military affairs analyst in the U.S. intelligence community, and was also a member of the powerful National Intelligence Council.
He was an expert on the Taliban's military capabilities, and his death came shortly before the New York Times reported on June 26 that Russia paid bounties to the Taliban to kill American soldiers in Afghanistan. 
Schinella committed suicide in his front yard. Above, his last known residence is seen
Schinella committed suicide in his front yard. Above, his last known residence is seen
Following the report, the NIC drafted a memo, which quickly leaked, claiming that the intelligence about the bounties was inconclusive.
The memo did not mention that the NIC's top analyst on military affairs and Taliban expert had killed himself days earlier. 
In a tribute to Schinella published in CityWatch, Corcoran wrote that he possessed an 'astonishing intelligence and an heroic work ethic.' 
'He traveled to more than 100 countries on six continents, spoke several languages and was able to pick up the basics of practically any language before he even left for the airport,' she wrote.
Schinella is also survived by two daughters from a previous marriage. 
In an article last week for CityWatch, Corcoran suggested that her husband viewed Russia as a distraction, and China as the real foreign threat to America.
'My husband Tony and I often discussed China's increasing influence in America’s public domain, as well as in other countries around the world,' she wrote.
In a tribute to Schinella, Corcoran wrote that he possessed an 'astonishing intelligence and an heroic work ethic'
In a tribute to Schinella, Corcoran wrote that he possessed an 'astonishing intelligence and an heroic work ethic'
'China was one of our shared interests, as he was half-Chinese and I received my MBA from a business school in Shanghai.'
Corcoran said that prior to his death, Schinella had recommended that she read Clive Hamilton's 2019 book Silent Invasion, which documents China's aggressive attempts to shape Australian politics and culture.
'My husband was an astute identifier and observer of stealth influences upon current events that are beneath the mainstream media radar, but warrant wide awareness of,' she wrote. 
'Our conversations could range from how the Chinese Security Services or PLA (People’s Liberation Army) had centralized its operations, to how they supported influence campaigns targeting universities, politicians, and public sentiment in Australia,' she continued.
'So while many of us in the United States have been preoccupied with Russian influence campaigns here, it turns out that the Chinese have been wreaking havoc on our ally Oz down under; and indeed the main threat to Australia's national security interests today come from its largest trading partner to the northwest: China.' 

No comments:

Post a comment